Red Nose? Listen to What It's Telling You

Published: 28th March 2011
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A nose is a nose is a nose, but by attending to its messages it can help you stay healthy.



Having a red nose can be extremely upsetting as it can be really difficult to hide.



Affecting both men and women equally, a really red nose can cause depression and isolation, often due to the careless comments of other people. A red nose can have a variety of causes, so it's wise to avoid generalisations.



Below, I list some of the main reasons for a red nose and what your nose may be trying to tell you.



Rosacea



This condition shows when the blood vessels in the nose are very close to the surface. People who suffer from rosacea may also get redness in other facial areas. Often found together with a form of acne, the nose can have pussing pustules when it is inflamed.



Inflammation can occur with no warning. However, it may be triggered by stress, emotions, soap allergy or because of a reaction to certain spicy foods. Treatment is generally by antibiotics - in oral and/or cream form - although some now say that laser treatment can cure it.



Research is needed, however, if the sufferer is considering laser treatment, as results are sometimes minimal or non-existent.



Green tinted make up (applied as a foundation) is available to help mask the condition as normal make up, even applied generously, does not cover the condition for long and can even aggravate it. Cleansing with an unscented, hypoallergenic soap or simple cream rather than regular soap is often helpful.



Alcohol



Over consumption of alcohol can cause the proverbial 'drinkers nose'. This is a clear warning to cut down on the amount of alcohol that you drink.



Menopause



This natural occurrence in a woman's body can cause hot flushes which can show in facial redness including the nose. This usually clears with time and/or with hormone replacement therapy.



Emotional upset.



Our emotions affect us in many ways. Unexpressed anger or emotional upset can cause the nose to become reddened. Nervousness, anxiety and fear can also have this effect. If you are struggling with any of these issues, then effective hypnotherapy can really help.



Rhinophyma or Bulbous Nose



Rhinophyma is known medically as phymatous rosacea. This condition causes the nose to become bulbulous in shape. The skin texture often looks thick and patchy. The nose generally has a reddish appearance, although parts of it can show as waxy and yellowish. Men tend to be affected more than women. Rhinophyma is thought to be connected to rosacea.



Sunburn



A rather simpler and short term reason for a red nose can be sunburn. Sun blocking creams are available made especially for the nose. Children may like to have those that come in various colours.



Colds



Colds and flu will often make the nose look red. This is generally due to the inflammation occurring within the nostrils and constant blowing and rubbing of the nose.



Hay Fever



Allergic reactions to certain foods or medications can cause a red nose. If this is the case, visit your doctor who may be able to help.



Thyroid



Some thyroid conditions can give rise to a red nose. If you have concerns regarding your thyroid functioning and also have a red nose then it would be worth mentioning this to your doctor.



Smoking



Smoking can cause the blood vessels in the nose to react, thereby causing it to become red. This is yet another reason to become a non-smoker. Again, good hypnotherapy can be of real help here.



Be sure to visit your doctor or medical advisor if you have a red nose that persists over a prolonged period of time.



Listen to what your nose is telling you and you will enjoy real health throughout your life's journey.





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Peter Field is a Member of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy and Fellow of the Royal Society of Health. His new self hypnosis for anxiety download and CD is now available. For more of his useful articles and info on therapy please visit Peter Field Birmingham Hypnotherapy

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